Reggae music to be protected by the UN

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Reggae has been added to a list of international cultural treasures which the United Nations has deemed worthy of protecting and promoting.

The music, which grew out of Jamaica in the 1960s thanks to artists like Toots and the Maytals, Peter Tosh and Bob Marley, was added to the collection due to its “intangible cultural heritage”.

Jamaica had applied for reggae’s inclusion on the list this year at a meeting of the UN agency on the island of Mauritius.

Reggae became popular in the United States but particularly flourished in the UK, which had become home to many Jamaican immigrants since the end of World War Two.

The British reggae label Trojan, which celebrates its 50th birthday this year, introduced the world to artists like Desmond Dekker, Jimmy Cliff and Bob and Marcia.

 

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